Let’s Get Reacquainted, Mr. Boomer

July 30, 2012

By Gina Pagliaro

Our team collaborated with AdAge last month to discuss methods for understanding the male baby boomer (Dudes to Dads: U.S. Men’s Attitudes Toward Life, Family, Work, available for $249.00 from Ad Age Insights). And, although we approach mature markets from a behavioral perspective – monitoring the seasons of human life – we had to face a realization. Boomer males fly under the marketing research radar unlike the well-explored and developed persona of the female boomer. Newsflash, our male protagonist no longer maintains the outlook of the heavy-handed, breadwinner from the 1950s.

Who is the boomer male today?

Who is the boomer male today? Pictured: Jon Hamm as Don Draper in AMC’s Mad Men. (Image © American Movie Classics Company LLC)

This clearly isn’t a novel statement. We all know that women and men are taking on different societal roles. But as marketers, are we really considering these evolving characteristics, due to the changing zeitgeist, in our communications efforts? Read the rest of this entry »

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eMarketer: Seniors Didn’t Catch the Wave

July 10, 2009

by David Weigelt

eMarketer released an article today titled “Few Senior Surfers Sighted.” “Not Internet-addicted?” That’s an interesting perspective. I don’t mean to suggest that seniors are “addicted” to using the Internet, but what this article infers is a bit of a stretch. The first element that piqued my interest is that it’s based on research from the Pew Research Center. Just six months ago, Pew published a pretty comprehensive study, titled Generations Online, indicating exactly the opposite of what eMarketer proposes: Seniors are responsible for the “biggest increase in internet use since 2005…While just over one-fourth (26%) of 70 to 75 year olds were online in 2005, 45% of that age group is currently online.”

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2009 Generations Online Report

March 27, 2009

by David Weigelt

The Pew Internet & American Life Project has released the 2009 version of its Generations Online report. As we suggest in our book Dot Boom, older generations are generally following suit with younger adults. Pew states, “Much as we watch demographic and age groups move up in degrees of access on our thermometers, we can probably expect to see these bars become more level as time goes on.”

A few takeaways include:

  • 70-75 year olds make up fastest growing segment of online users
  • Email most popular online activity for adults 64+ while email usage is waning for younger adults

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