What Google+ Means for 50+

August 4, 2011

By Michael Epps Utley

Google+ has been invitation-only so far, but growth has been astounding. It has reached 20 million users in 24 days compared to 1,035 days for Twitter and 1,152 for Facebook. It offers new features such as Circles and Hangouts, which seem to be more intuitive for many managing different areas of life.

 [Source: https://plus.google.com/112418301618963883780/posts]

For those serving the 50+ markets, this new entry raises questions. Is Google+ going to replace Facebook, which boomers and seniors have been adopting in great numbers over the past couple of years? And how can I do social media well if it is always going to be a moving target? Read the rest of this entry »


2009 Generations Online Report

March 27, 2009

by David Weigelt

The Pew Internet & American Life Project has released the 2009 version of its Generations Online report. As we suggest in our book Dot Boom, older generations are generally following suit with younger adults. Pew states, “Much as we watch demographic and age groups move up in degrees of access on our thermometers, we can probably expect to see these bars become more level as time goes on.”

A few takeaways include:

  • 70-75 year olds make up fastest growing segment of online users
  • Email most popular online activity for adults 64+ while email usage is waning for younger adults

Read the rest of this entry »


Experience Matters for Presidential Candidates, So Where’s the User Experience?

September 25, 2007

In the last presidential election, one out four voters were members of AARP. And the Iowa caucus rapidly approaching, voters over the age of 50 are proving to be just as important this time around.

According to this Reuter’s article, Iowa’s elderly population is the state’s largest voting constituency and could make or break some presidential hopefuls. (Sen. Hillary Clinton has struggled against Sen. Barack Obama and former Sen. John Edwards in Iowa, yet voters over 60 prefer her by a wide margin.) The Iowa Democratic Party said about 64 percent of those who participated in the 2004 caucus were at least 50 years old.

Read the rest of this entry »


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