What Google+ Means for 50+

August 4, 2011

By Michael Epps Utley

Google+ has been invitation-only so far, but growth has been astounding. It has reached 20 million users in 24 days compared to 1,035 days for Twitter and 1,152 for Facebook. It offers new features such as Circles and Hangouts, which seem to be more intuitive for many managing different areas of life.

 [Source: https://plus.google.com/112418301618963883780/posts]

For those serving the 50+ markets, this new entry raises questions. Is Google+ going to replace Facebook, which boomers and seniors have been adopting in great numbers over the past couple of years? And how can I do social media well if it is always going to be a moving target? Read the rest of this entry »

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The Ageless Benefits of YouTube Captions

November 29, 2010

by Chris Boehman

Youtube, the world’s #2 search engine, has a powerful feature that many users don’t take advantage of: captions. Captions make your video available to more people (of all ages) in a lot of surprising ways, and benefit consumers and content creators alike. First, the obvious one: Read the rest of this entry »


eMarketer: Seniors Didn’t Catch the Wave

July 10, 2009

by David Weigelt

eMarketer released an article today titled “Few Senior Surfers Sighted.” “Not Internet-addicted?” That’s an interesting perspective. I don’t mean to suggest that seniors are “addicted” to using the Internet, but what this article infers is a bit of a stretch. The first element that piqued my interest is that it’s based on research from the Pew Research Center. Just six months ago, Pew published a pretty comprehensive study, titled Generations Online, indicating exactly the opposite of what eMarketer proposes: Seniors are responsible for the “biggest increase in internet use since 2005…While just over one-fourth (26%) of 70 to 75 year olds were online in 2005, 45% of that age group is currently online.”

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2009 Generations Online Report

March 27, 2009

by David Weigelt

The Pew Internet & American Life Project has released the 2009 version of its Generations Online report. As we suggest in our book Dot Boom, older generations are generally following suit with younger adults. Pew states, “Much as we watch demographic and age groups move up in degrees of access on our thermometers, we can probably expect to see these bars become more level as time goes on.”

A few takeaways include:

  • 70-75 year olds make up fastest growing segment of online users
  • Email most popular online activity for adults 64+ while email usage is waning for younger adults

Read the rest of this entry »


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